Calendar

All events are free and open to the public.  Outdoor events are subject to cancellation or postponement due to to weather–check our Facebook or Twitter feed to get the latest scheduling updates.


July 6, 2020
  • VAS Monthly Meeting

    July 6, 2020  7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

    This will be a virtual meeting via Zoom.  A Zoom link will be available a few days before the meeting.  

    All VAS Members will get the Zoom link.
    If you are not a member contact vtastro.org so that we can email you the Zoom meeting link. 

    Free and Open to the Public

    4 Mini-Talks

    Some Springtime Galaxies and Nebulae

    By Richard Whitehead

    Millions and Billions...making DRY numbers a bit more interesting for outreach programs

    By Cale Shipman

    Images from the Texas Star Party

    By Stive Grimsley

    Images from the Winter Star Party

    By Terri Zittritsch


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August 3, 2020
  • VAS Monthly Meeting

    August 3, 2020  7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

    This will be likely be a virtual meeting via Zoom.
    A Zoom link will be available a few days before the meeting.  

    All VAS Members will get the Zoom link.
    If you are not a member contact vtastro.org so that we can email you the Zoom meeting link.

    Free and Open to the Public

    Part 1 of 2: 

    The 2020 Opposition of Mars:

    Our Last Chance to See Mars This Favorable until 2035

    Of all the planets visible; Mars is surely the one that has cultivated the most human imagination and interest. Approximately every 15.7 years; Mars has a close approach to Earth. In the late Summer and Autumn of 2020; Mars will have a fairly close approach to Earth. At the time around Mars’ close approach, amateur size telescopes will have some reasonable views of Martian surface features. Mars is the only planet in our Solar System (besides Earth) that we have a reasonable chance of seeing the actual surface features such as volcanoes and canyons. Mars is a dynamic planet with surface features that show subtle changes over time due to the effects of the Martian atmosphere. The Martian planet displays changes such as variability in cloud formations, shrinking ice caps, and occasional dust storms. This talk is designed for visual amateur observations through telescopes of 4” – 8” aperture. This showing of Mars is our last chance to see the Red Planet in a favorable position until the year 2035.

    Part 1 Outline:

    A. Introduction to Mars

    B. Mars Quiz (History of Mars and Mankind)

    C. Mars Orbital Characteristics

    D. Factors effecting Mars Observations: Atmospherics

    The presenter; Gary T. Nowak is a long-time member of the VAS and is a former club president and former board member. His specialty is advanced visual amateur astronomic searches with telescopes and binoculars. The presenter has built several telescopes over the years which included grinding and polishing his own telescope mirrors. His first recorded observations with a telescope were in 1968. He has been observing Mars since 1971. In 1999, he discovered a Nova visually with binoculars. He is a member of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO).

    See more details

     

     

September 14, 2020
  • VAS Monthly Meeting

    September 14, 2020  7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

    This may be likely be a virtual meeting via Zoom.
    If so a Zoom link will be available a few days before the meeting.  

    All VAS Members will get the Zoom link.
    If you are not a member contact vtastro.org so that we can email you the Zoom meeting link.

    Free and Open to the Public

    Part 2 of 2: 

    The 2020 Opposition of Mars:

    Our Last Chance to See Mars This Favorable until 2035

    Of all the planets visible; Mars is surely the one that has cultivated the most human imagination and interest. Approximately every 15.7 years; Mars has a close approach to Earth. In the late Summer and Autumn of 2020; Mars will have a fairly close approach to Earth. At the time around Mars’ close approach, amateur size telescopes will have some reasonable views of Martian surface features. Mars is the only planet in our Solar System (besides Earth) that we have a reasonable chance of seeing the actual surface features such as volcanoes and canyons. Mars is a dynamic planet with surface features that show subtle changes over time due to the effects of the Martian atmosphere. The Martian planet displays changes such as variability in cloud formations, shrinking ice caps, and occasional dust storms. This talk is designed for visual amateur observations through telescopes of 4” – 8” aperture. This showing of Mars is our last chance to see the Red Planet in a favorable position until the year 2035.

    Part 2 Outline:

    A. Factors effecting Mars Observations: Instrumental

    B. Amateur Telescopes for Visual Mars Observations

    C. Filters for Mars

    D. Observing Mars: Survey of Various Visual Features

    E. Changing Mars Phenomena: Atmospherics

    F. Mars Moons

    G. Summary

    The presenter; Gary T. Nowak is a long-time member of the VAS and is a former club president and former board member. His specialty is advanced visual amateur astronomic searches with telescopes and binoculars. The presenter has built several telescopes over the years which included grinding and polishing his own telescope mirrors. His first recorded observations with a telescope were in 1968. He has been observing Mars since 1971. In 1999, he discovered a Nova visually with binoculars. He is a member of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO).

    See more details